Curriculum Vitae

Outline

  1. Personal
  2. Education
  3. Professional Experience
  4. Teaching Experience
  5. Students Supervised
  6. University Service
  7. Professional Service
  8. Presentations at Professional Meetings
  9. Invited Seminar Speaker
  10. Grants
  11. Awards and Distinctions
  12. Noticeable Achievements and Highlights

I. Personal

Citizenship
Naturalized US citizen
Present University Department
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,
Utah State University
435.797.1630
E-mail: a.i.boldyrev@usu.edu

II. Education

B. S./M.S. Honor Diploma (Chemistry), Chemistry Department, Novosibirsk University, Novosibirsk, USSR, 1974.
Ph. D. (Physical Chemistry) Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow, USSR/Institute of New Chemical Problems of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, USSR, 1978.
Dr. Sci. (The highest scientific degree in the USSR., analog of the Habilitation in Germany) (Chemical Physics): Institute of Chemical Physics USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, USSR/Physico-Chemical Institute, Moscow, USSR, 1987.

III. Professional Experience

Research Assistant, Institute of New Chemical Problems USSR Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, USSR. November 1974 - November 1976.
Research Fellow, Institute of New Chemical Problems USSR Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, USSR. November 1976 - January 1983.
Research Fellow, Institute of Chemical Physics USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, USSR. January 1983 - January 1984.
Senior Researcher, Head of Computational Chemistry Group, Institute of Chemical Physics USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, USSR. January 1984 - January 1986.
Lecturer at the Moscow Physico-Technical Institute, Dolgoprudny, USSR. September 1987 - September 1989.
Leading Researcher, Head of Computational Chemistry Group, Institute of Chemical Physics USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, USSR. January 1986 - January 1992.
Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, Institute of Organic Chemistry, Erlangen-Nurnberg University, Erlangen, Germany : January 1990 - December 1991.
Visiting/Research Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, January 1992 - August 1999.
Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Logan, August 1999 - July 2002.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, August 1999 - June 2002.
Associate Professor, Utah State University, Logan, July 2002 - April 2005.
Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, June 2002 - April 2006.
Professor, Utah State University, Logan, April 2005 - present.
Adjunct Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, June 2006 - present.

IV. Teaching Experience

  1. Quantum Chemistry, Moscow Physico-Technical Institute, Dolgoprudny, USSR Fall 1987.
  2. Quantum Chemistry, Moscow Physico-Technical Institute, Dolgoprudny, USSR Fall 1988.
  3. General Chemistry 222, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Summer 1998.
  4. General Chemistry 223, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Fall 1998.
  5. Physical Chemistry 3060, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 1999.
  6. Physical Chemistry 3070, Utah State University, Logan, Spring 2000.
  7. Physical Chemistry 3070, Utah State University, Logan, Spring 2001.
  8. Physical Chemistry 3080, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 2001.
  9. Physical Chemistry 6000, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 2001.
  10. Physical Chemistry 3090, Utah State University, Logan, Spring 2002.
  11. General Chemistry 1220, Utah State University, Logan, Spring 2002.
  12. General Chemistry 1220, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 2002.
  13. Molecular Spectroscopy, 7030, Utah State University, Logan, Spring, 2003.
  14. Physical Chemistry 3060, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 2003.
  15. Physical Chemistry 3070, Utah State University, Logan, Spring 2004.
  16. Physical Chemistry 3060, Utah State University, Logan, Fall 2004.
  17. Molecular Spectroscopy, 6020, Utah State University, Logan, Spring, 2005.
  18. Physical Chemistry 3060, Utah State University, Logan, Fall, 2006.
  19. Molecular Spectroscopy, 6020, Utah State University, Logan, Spring, 2007.
  20. Physical Chemistry, 3060, Utah State University, Logan, Fall, 2007.
  21. Physical Chemistry, 3070, Utah State University, Logan, Spring, 2008.

V. Students Supervised:

Ph. D.

  1. Leonid Sukhanov, Institute of Atomic Energy, Moscow, USSR, 1984 (co-supervisor).
  2. Vasily Pershin, Institute of Chemistry USSR Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, USSR, 1987.
  3. Yuri Kirillov, Moscow Institute of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow, USSR, 1988 (co-supervisor).
  4. Sonia Kramarenko, Moscow Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow, USSR, 1990 (co-superviser).
  5. Veronika Nefedova, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 1996 (co-supervisor).
  6. Aleksey E. Kuznetsov, graduated from Utah State University in 2003. Currently he is an Alexander von Humboldt fellow at Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin, Germany.
  7. Anastassia N. Alexandrova, graduated from Utah State University in 2005. Currently she is a postdoctoral researcher at Yale University.
  8. Dmitry Yu. Zubarev, graduated from Utah State University in 2008. Currently he is a postdoctoral researcher at University of California at Berkeley.
  9. Boris B. Averkiev, fourth year student, Utah State University, Logan.
  10. Alina Sergeeva, second year student, Utah State University, Logan.
  11. Jared Olsen, second year student, Utah State University, Logan.

M. S.

  1. Grant Geske. Utah State University, Logan. He graduated in the Spring Semester 2001. He is currently a Ph. D student at University of Wisconsin, Madison.
  2. Ben Elliott graduated from Utah State University in 2005. Currently he is a Ph. D. student at Yale University.
  3. Seth Call. Utah State University, Logan. He is a Ph. D. student at BYU.

Undergraduate students

  1. Nathan A. Cannon, worked with me from January 1, 2000 until July 31, 2001. Currently he is a student at Medical School, Washington University, St. Louis.
  2. Ben Elliot, he worked with me from February 1, 2001- May 2003. Currently he is a Ph. D student at Yale University.
  3. Kelly Birch, he worked with me from May 1, 2001 until September 2003. Currently he is a manager at Merck Pharmaceutical Co.
  4. Musstafa Al-Shemali, he worked with me from May 1, 2001 until May 31 2003.
  5. Eldon Koyle, he worked in my group from January 12, 2004 - May 31, 2005.
  6. Derec Holden, he is working in my group from January 8 - April 30, 2006.

VI. University Service

University Committees
High Performance Computing Task Force (2005-present).
University Extension
Tenure and Promotion Committee for Barry Klassen (2001-2003).
Physics Department Committees
Tenure and Promotion Committee for Haeyeon Yang (2002-2007).
Department Committees
Graduate Recruiting Committee (1999-present) Chair from 2006 - present.
Advisory Committee (2001-2007)
Adviser to the Undergraduate Chemical Club of the Utah State University (2000-2003).
Lecturer Search Committee, 2002.
General Chemistry Steering Committee, 2001-2003.
Tenure and Promotion Committee for Phillip Silva (Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, USU), 2002-2008.
Recruiting committee for staff assistant, fall 2004.
PT 5 years committee for John Hubbard, fall 2004.
PT 5 years committee for Lance Seefeldt, fall 2006.
Chair PT 5 years committee for David Farrelly, fall 2006.
Chair of recruiting committee, fall 2006-pesent.
Chair of a faculty search committee, fall 2007.
PT 5 years committee for Vernon Parker, fall 2008.
Serving on graduate committees
  1. Ph. D. Veronika V. Nefedova, The University of Utah, 1992-1996.
  2. M. S. Daniel Ward, Utah State University, 1999-2000.
  3. M. S. Grant G. Geske,Utah State University, 1999-2001.
  4. Ph. D. Aleksey E. Kuznetsov, Utah State University, 2000-2003.
  5. Ph. D. Anastassia N. Alexandrova, Utah State University, 2001-2005.
  6. M. S. Ben Elliott, Utah State University, 2003-2005.
  7. Ph. D. Jeong-Young Ji, Utah State University, 2002-2006.
  8. Ph. D. Alexandra Mikosz, Utah State University, 2002-2007.
  9. Jordan Ramilowski, Utah State University, 2005-present.
  10. Boris B. Averkiev, Utah State University, 2006-present.
  11. Prakash Joshi, Utah State University, 2007-present.
  12. Alina Sergeeva, Utah State University, 2008-present.
  13. Jared Olson, Utah State University, 2008-present.

VII. Professional Service

Membership in Professional Associations
American Chemical Society
American Physical Society
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Alexander von Humboldt Association of America
Evaluation of Manuscripts for Journals
J. Amer. Chem. Soc.
Phys. Rev. Lett.
Phys. Rev.
J. Chem. Phys.
J. Phys. Chem.
J. Mol. Spectrosc.
J. Mol. Struct.
Chem. Phys. Lett.
Chem. Phys.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
Int. J. Quant. Chem.
J. Comput. Chem.
Russ. J. Inorg. Chem.
Russ. J. Phys. Chem.
Evaluation of Proposals
Petroleum Research Fund (American Chemical Society)
National Science Foundation
Department of Defence.
Department of Energy.

VIII. Presentations at Professional Meetings

  1. XVI International Conference on Coordination Chemistry, Hamburg, FGR, 1976.
  2. Workshop on Structure and Determination of Molecular Parameters in the Gas Phase. Moscow, USSR, 1976.
  3. VI Workshop on Physical and Mathematical Methods in Coordination Chemistry, Kishinev, USSR, 1977.
  4. XIII Chugaev Conference on Chemistry of Coordination Compounds, Moscow,1978.
  5. XIX International Conference on Coordination Chemistry, Prague, Czechoslovakia, 1978.
  6. Current State of Theory of Atoms and Molecules, Vilnius, USSR, 1979.
  7. VII Workshop on Physical and Mathematical Methods in Coordination Chemistry, Kishinev, USSR, 1980.
  8. XIV Chugaev Conference on Chemistry of Coordination Compounds, Ivanovo, USSR, 1981.
  9. VI All-Union Symposium on Fluorine Chemistry, Novosibirsk, USSR, 1981.
  10. Microsymposium on Quantum Chemistry, Liblice, Czechoslovakia, 1981.
  11. 12th Medeleev Congress on General and Applied Chemistry, Moscow, USSR, 1981.
  12. VI Symposium on Intermolecular Interactions and Molecular Conformations, Vilnius, USSR, 1982.
  13. First All-Union Conference on Solid State Chemistry, Leningrad, USSR, 1982.
  14. XXII International Conference on Coordination Chemistry, Budapest, Hungary,1982.
  15. VIII Workshop on Physical and Mathematical Methods in Coordination Chemistry, Kishinev, USSR, 1983.
  16. XIII All-Union Conference on Organic Semiconductors, Agveran, USSR, 1984.
  17. VII All-Union Symposium on Fluorine Chemistry, Dushanbe, USSR, 1984.
  18. IX All-Union Conference on Quantum Chemistry, Ivanovo, USSR, 1985.
  19. X All-Union Conference on Applied Vibrational Spectroscopy in Inorganic and Coordination Compounds, Ivanovo, USSR, 1985.
  20. VIII Microsymposium on Elementary Processes and Chemical Reactivity, Liblice, Czechoslovakia, 1985.
  21. VII All-Union Conference on Computer Applications in Chemical Studies and Molecular Spectroscopy, Riga, USSR, 1986.
  22. International Conference on Organic Materials in Electronics, Tashkent, USSR, 1987.
  23. World Congress of World Association of Theoretical Organic Chemists, Budapest, Hungary, 1987.
  24. International Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Properties of Molecules and Crystals, Cavtat, Yugoslavia, 1988.
  25. Invited to speak at European Symposium on Organic Reactivity, Goteborg, Sweden, 1991.
  26. VII International Congress on Quantum Chemistry, Menton, France, 1991.
  27. Invited to speak at 14th Austin Symposium on Molecular Structure, Austin, USA,1992.
  28. 13th Annual West Coast Theoretical Chemistry Conference, Richland, USA, 1992.
  29. Invited to speak at 14th Annual West Coast Theoretical Chemistry Conference, Los Angeles, USA, 1993.
  30. 8th American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry, Rochester, USA, 1993.
  31. Invited to speak at 16th Annual West Coast Theoretical Chemistry Conference, San Diego, USA, 1995.
  32. 36th Sanybel Symposium, San Augustin, USA, 1996.
  33. Invited to speak at The 37th Sanybel Symposium, San Augustin, USA, 1996.
  34. Invited to speak at The 9th International Congress on Quantum Chemistry, Atlanta, USA, 1997.
  35. Invited to speak at The Second International Conference of the Chemistry of the Alkali and Alkaline earth Metals, Erlangen, Germany, 1997.
  36. 10th American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry, Boulder, USA, 1999.
  37. Invited to speak at The 9th Conference on Current Trends in Computational Chemistry, Vicksburg, USA, 2000.
  38. Invited to speak at The International Symposium Computer Assistance to Chemical Research, Moscow, Russia, 2001.
  39. Invited to speak at The 2001 ACS Northwest Regional Meeting, Seattle, USA, 2001.
  40. Invited to speak at The 14th Canadian Symposium on Theoretical Chemistry, Ottawa, Canada, 2001.
  41. Contributing Talk, American Chemical Society, 223rd National Meeting, April, 2002, Orlando.
  42. Contributing Talk at The Second Harry Wiener International Memorial Conference, July, 2003, Brewster's Kananskis Guest Ranch, Alberta, Canada.<
  43. Invited to speak at The 226th American Chemical Society National Meeting, September, 2003, New York.
  44. Invited to speak at Southeastern Regional Meeting of American Chemical Society, November, 2003, Atlanta.
  45. Invited to Speak at Joint American Chemical Society 59th Northwest & 18th Rocky Mountain Regional Metting, Logan, June, 2004.
  46. Invited to Speak at the 7th Congress of World Association of Theoretically Oriented Chemists 2005, Cape Town, South Africa, January 15-21, 2005.
  47. Invited to Speak at the Intermolecular Interactions: New Challenges for Ab Initio Theory, Telluride, Colorado, June 25-July 2, 2006.
  48. Invited to Speak at International Workshop on "Clusters - A Bridge Across Disciplines", Jekyll Island, Georgia, December 16-20, 2006.
  49. Plenary Lecture at International Symposium on Size Selected Clusters, Brend, Austria, March , 2007.
  50. Invited to speak at Workshop on Molecular Anions and Electron-Molecular Interactions, Park City, Utah, June 29-July 3, 2007.
  51. Invited to be on the International Board of the VIII Girona Seminar on Aromaticity: Basics and Applications. Invited to speak at the VIII Girona Seminar on Aromaticity: Basics and Applications, Girona, Spain, July 6-10, 2008.
  52. Invited Lecture at the World Congress WATOC 2008, September 14-19, 2008.

IX. Invited Seminar Speaker

  1. Moscow State University, Moscow, USSR, 1975.
  2. Institute of High Temperature of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, USSR, 1977.
  3. Moscow State University, Moscow, 1978.
  4. Komenius University, Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, 1983.
  5. Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Czechoslovakia Academy of Sciences, Prague, 1983.
  6. Institute of Chemistry of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, 1984.
  7. Leningrad University, Leningrad, USSR, 1985.
  8. Moscow Chemico-Physical Institute, Moscow, USSR, 1985.
  9. Erlanger-Nurnberg University, Erlangen, Germany, 1989.
  10. Heidelberg University, Germany, 1989.
  11. Karlsruhe University, Germany, 1989.
  12. Kaiserslautern University, Germany, 1989.
  13. Hanover University, Germany, 1989.
  14. Braunschweig University, Germany, 1989.
  15. Bonn University, Germany, 1989.
  16. University of Nijmegen, Netherlands, 1990.
  17. Bern University, Switzerland, 1990.
  18. University of Colorado at Boulder, USA, 1993.
  19. San Diego State University, San Diego, USA, 1994.
  20. Washington State University, Pullman, USA, 1994.
  21. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA, 1994.
  22. Berlin Technical University, Germany, 1997.
  23. Marburg University, Germany, 1997.
  24. Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia, 1997.
  25. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA, 1998.
  26. University of Missouri-Rola, Rola, USA, 1998.
  27. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA, 1999.
  28. Kansas State University, Manhattan, USA, 2001.
  29. University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada, 2003.
  30. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA, 2003.
  31. Southern Adventist University, Collegedale, TN, USA, 2004.
  32. University of California at Davis, USA, 2004.
  33. State University of New York, Binghamton, USA, 2005.
  34. Notre Dame University, Indiana, USA, 2005.
  35. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA, 2005.
  36. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, USA, 2007.
  37. Johns Hopkins University, USA, 2008.

X. Grants

  1. American Chemical Society - Petroleum Research Fund:
    Title: "Theoretical Design of Large Molecules and New Materials", period 2000-2002, amount awarded: $60,000
  2. USU New Faculty Research Grant:
    Title: "Theoretical Design of Oxygen Neutral and Ionic Clusters Beyond Ozone", period 2000-2001, amount awarded: $14,975
  3. American Chemical Society - Petroleum Research Fund:
    Title: "Advancing the Aromaticity Concept into All-Metal Species", period 2002-2005, amount awarded: $120,000
  4. U. S. National Science Foundation:
    Title: "Evolution of Chemical Bonding upon Fusion of Planar Aromatic Clusters into 2-D and 3-D Clusters and into 3-D Networks", period 2004-2007, amount awarded: $240,000.
  5. American Chemical Society - Petroleum Research Fund:
    Title: "Probing Aromaticity in Transition Metal Clusters", 2005-2007, amount awarded: $80,000
  6. U. S. National Science Foundation:
    Title: "Development of New Island Aromatic Fragment (IAF) Analysis for Deciphering Chemical Bonding in Clusters", period 2007-2010, amount awarded: $294,000.

XI. Awards & Distinctions

  1. Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, Germany, January 1990 - December 1992.
  2. Invitation to Speak at the Panel Discussion "Views of Future Developments in Science" at the 14 th Canadian Symposium on Theoretical Chemistry, August 7, 2001, Ottawa, Canada.
  3. The Utah State College of Science Researcher of the Year for 2005.
  4. Guest Editor for the Jack Simons Festschrift issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A (vol. 109, issue 50, December 22, 2005).
  5. Member of the editorial board of Physical Chemistry: An Indian Journal, 2006-present.
  6. Member of the editorial board of Chemistry: An Indian Journal (Physical Chemistry Section), 2006-present.

XII. Noticeable Achievements and Highlights

  1. I developed simple theoretical models capable of predicting molecular systems with very high electron affinities known today as "superhalogens" as well as molecular systems with very low first ionization potentials known as "superalkalies". The last species have been included in the textbook "Quantum Chemical Methods in Main-Group Chemistry" written by T. M. Klapotke and A. Schulz, (Wiley, London, England, 1998) as a section 8.1 (pp. 125-129).
  2. The major area of my recent research is the study of chemical bonding in new nonstoichiometric molecules, clusters and materials. During this research we theoretically designed and experimentally made first pentaatomic molecules containing tetracoordinate planar carbon molecules, a goal thought to be impossible in chemistry. This work was highlighted in Chemical and Engineering New magazine as their news of the week (August 21, 2000, p.8).
  3. Working on new nonstoichiometric species we recently made another discovery. We discovered that all-metal systems could be aromatic. Aromaticity was considered a property of organic matter and was not previously reported for all-metal systems. We published two articles in Science magazine on this topic. This work attracted a lot of attention and was highlighted in Salt Lake City Tribune (February 2, p. B3 (2001), as well as twice in Chemical and Engineering News magazine (February 5, p. 8 (2001) and April 28, 2003, p.8) as news of the week, and in Science and Technology section (September 24, 2001, pp.39-40, December 15, 2003, pp. 23-26), and in two other national and international magazines: Science News (February 17, p. 111 (2001)), and Chemistry and Industry (February 19, p.97 (2001)). Figure 2 of our article in Structural Chemistry (13, 141, 2002) was used as the cover illustration for this issue. Our article on metal antiaromaticity (Science, v.300, pp. 622-624) was selected among three articles as a highlight of the 2003 in inorganic chemistry (C&E News, December 22, 2003, p.45).
  4. Our combine experimental and theoretical proof that boron clusters are planar and our explanation of the planarity on the basis of multiple aromaticity was also highlighted in C&E News, March 1, 2004, p.28) in Science and Technology section. We were invited to write a review article on boron clusters for Coordination Chemistry Review, which was published last year (Coord. Chem. Rev. 250, 2811-2866 (2006)). We also published an invited article on comprehensive chemical bonding analysis for a special issue of Journal of Computational Chemistry (J. Comput. Chem. 28, 251-268, 2007) dedicated to 90th anniversary of the introduction of Lewis structure in chemistry.
  5. On the basis of combine experimental and theoretical study we have shown that the Ta3O3- cluster is the first δ-aromatic species (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46, 4277, 2007). We proposed that many other planar clusters containing transition metal atoms in low oxidation states could also have δ-aromaticity. That work was highlighted in C&E News, May 7, 2007, p.54.

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